Years of pagan rule

Although Christianity spread in the region under Oleg’s rule, Vladimir had remained a thoroughgoing pagan, taking eight hundred concubines (along with numerous wives) and erecting pagan statues and shrines to gods.[16] He may have attempted to reform Slavic paganism by establishing the thunder-god, Perun, as a supreme deity.

According to the early Slavic chronicle called Tale of Bygone Years, which describes life in Kievan Rus’ up to the year 1110, he sent his envoys throughout the civilized world to judge first hand the major religions of the time, Islam, Roman Catholicism, Judaism, and Byzantine Orthodoxy. They were most impressed with their visit to Constantinople, saying, “We knew not whether we were in Heaven or on Earth… We only know that God dwells there among the people, and their service is fairer than the ceremonies of other nations.”According to the early Slavic chronicle called Tale of Bygone Years, which describes life in Kievan Rus’ up to the year 1110, he sent his envoys throughout the civilized world to judge first hand the major religions of the time, Islam, Roman Catholicism, Judaism, and Byzantine Orthodoxy. They were most impressed with their visit to Constantinople, saying, “We knew not whether we were in Heaven or on Earth… We only know that God dwells there among the people, and their service is fairer than the ceremonies of other nations.”

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